‘Lost Spring’ explains the grinding poverty and traditions that condemn thousands of people to a life of abject poverty. Do you agree? Why/Why not?

In ‘Lost Spring’ Anees Jung analyses the grinding poverty and traditions, which condemn thousands of people to a life of abject misery and the slum children to exploitation. The basis of her analysis are the ragpickers of Seemapuri where she meets a little boy named Saheb and Mukesh, whose family is one of the families who have been the bangle makers of Firozabad for generations. Both these children want education so that they can either escape their situation or change it. But, Saheb and Mukesh and others like them are caught in the vicious circle of poverty, apathy and injustice and are affected by the greed of others. This is why, education and healthy and clean living conditions are a distant dream for them. Every day, they have to face various hardships. Yet, they cannot organise themselves into cooperative due to the fear that it might be treated as being illegal. Ultimately, slum children like Saheb and Mukesh have to carry forward the family occupation or find odd jobs to earn a living. In the process, their childhood is the lost spring of their life.

1 thought on “‘Lost Spring’ explains the grinding poverty and traditions that condemn thousands of people to a life of abject poverty. Do you agree? Why/Why not?”

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *